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Tuck School of Business

Paul Danos - Dean
Managers of the future must understand the markets in which their businesses operate, including customers, suppliers, workers, governments, etc. All of these parties can come from different parts of the globe, from different cultures. As markets globalize, managers must have global outlooks and they must master best practices wherever those practices originate.
1. The (business) world is changing rapidly. Does globalization mean, too, that we need a new kind of "global" manager?

Managers of the future must understand the markets in which their businesses operate, including customers, suppliers, workers, governments, etc. All of these parties can come from different parts of the globe, from different cultures. As markets globalize, managers must have global outlooks and they must master best practices wherever those practices originate.

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2. If so, what does he look like? Is the manager of the future a sort of global nomad, working with his laptop in hotel rooms and airport lounges, living some years at one place on the earth, some years at another?

What is essential is having a global attitude, which often requires a broad education, business training and some amount of international travel and work assignments. To some extent, technology will allow for managing at a distance, but there will always be a need for some "face-to-face" time.

3. What are the qualifications of the Manager of Tomorrow? His talents, language skills etc.?

I believe that a broad liberal education is essential topped off with rigorous business education, such as an MBA from a top school. Young students should learn about the history and cultures of the world and the basic technologies that will define the future of mankind. Then after they have gotten some real world experience, a full-time MBA such as Tuck's where students come from around the world and where the courses emphasize global issues is a great way to understand how business operate in across cultures. The combination of a fine first degree, experience and a full-time MBA is a great combination for the modern manager.

4. Will we have a very tiny elite of truly "global" top managers and a more "national" middle management? In other words: Do we tend towards a two-class manager system?

I believe that the businesses will give their most talented people the global exposure they need to fully develop into world class managers. Tuck has a program, Global 2020, that is aimed directly at the most talented younger managers who are being groomed for leadership. After a student gets their MBA and have worked in businesses for a few years, they should be exposed to cutting edge ideas in a rigorous program of management training, especially one that emphasizes the global challenges faced by their company.

5. As a business school, how do you see your role in shaping the world of tomorrow?

The MBA has evolved from its inception at Tuck one hundred years ago into a truly remarkable means of changing the careers of thousands of young people each year. The world's top MBA programs allow the most talented to spring into high-potential jobs in the world's leading businesses. No other graduate program takes such a diverse group and in two years of intensive education gives them such outstanding and varying opportunities. In addition the research output of the best schools informs business practice and leads to productivity gains which is the key to world prosperity.
Dieser Artikel ist erschienen am 23.02.2001