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Stanford Graduate School of Business

John Roberts - Director Global Management Program
Absolutely. A "global" manager must have the business skills expected of any manager but also be able to apply these skills in a variety of settings, where laws, cultures, social forces and market arrangements differ an where different ways of doing business prevail. S/he must alos deal with more compexity and greater ambiguity than managers have traditionally faced and be able to work in an environment where technology plays an increasing role.
1. The (business) world is changing rapidly. Does globalization mean, too, that we need a new kind of "global" manager?

Absolutely. A "global" manager must have the business skills expected of any manager but also be able to apply these skills in a variety of settings, where laws, cultures, social forces and market arrangements differ an where different ways of doing business prevail. S/he must alos deal with more compexity and greater ambiguity than managers have traditionally faced and be able to work in an environment where technology plays an increasing role.

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2. If so, what does he look like? Is the manager of the future a sort of global nomad, working with his laptop in hotel rooms and airport lounges, living some years at one place on the earth, some years at another?

Managers of the future can be global nomads, dividing their careers among various international assignments. They can also be based in one location, e.g., corporate headquarters, with the computer and the internet linking them to their companys' markets and/or operations (suppliers, customers, colleagues, etc.) in the outside world. That is what is meant by

3. What are the qualifications of the Manager of Tomorrow? His talents, language skills etc.?

In addition to conventional business skills, managers of tomorrow must be able to adapt to changing environments in which they do business. This includes the ability to adjust to different time zones, lifestyles, cultures, languages, as well as the ability to operate in a environment in which we are increasingly dependent on technology to connect us to the "global village."

4. Will we have a very tiny elite of truly "global" top managers and a more "national" middle management? In other words: Do we tend towards a two-class manager system?

The tendency toward a two-class manager system will actually diminish, as more will be demanded of conventional middle managers, who will be required to have the skills to function in a global environment. In other words, increasing globalization will force companies to see their markets in an international context, and their managers' will have to adjust their skills accordingly.

5. As a business school, how do you see your role in shaping the world of tomorrow?

We see our role in terms of helping studenta prepare themselves to be managers who are equipped to run global organizations. We do this by: undertaking fundamental research on issues related to managing in the global economy integrating the results of research on global issues into our curriculum supporting student activities with a global focus providing opportunities for our students to have international experiences assisting students in finding jobs leading to global management careers fostering a community of students, faculty, and alumni interested in global issues.
Dieser Artikel ist erschienen am 23.02.2001